The World Cup of Caring

The World Cup of Caring

Many in the sports world have their eyes focused on Toronto, Canada and the World Cup of Hockey. It’s a round robin tournament with six leading hockey countries (Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, Sweden, Russia, and the U.S.), and two very unique teams: one comprised of players under 23-years-old from the U. S. and Canada (Team North America); and players from Europe from countries that don’t have a national team represented (Team Europe). This World Cup features several historic rivalries, Canada v. U.S., Finland v. Sweden, and Russia v. everybody. It’s been an exciting tournament with a number of surprises.

Watching the tournament, I got to thinking about an American Sentinel University tournament entry. Anyone that has visited our campus in Aurora, Colorado, is quick to ask about all the colorful, framed, signed hockey jerseys that grace our walls.* There are roughly 25 of them, primarily representing NHL teams, but a few others as well. If we ignored the fact that some of the jerseys are from retired players, we’d have a very competitive team.

All those jerseys on our campus beg the question: Why?

Cornell University players helping to build a playground in the Dominican Republic. American Sentinel University supported them by purchasing jerseys signed by Cornell alumni who played or play in the NHL.
Cornell University players helping to build a playground in the Dominican Republic. American Sentinel University supported them by purchasing jerseys signed by Cornell alumni who played or play in the NHL.

It started simply enough when I saw some signed jerseys for auction. The players had signed them
and the auction was to support a children’s service organization. Many NHL, college and other sports organizations support causes aimed at children and use signed jerseys to raise money. And most do more that just raise money. My Alma Mater’s hockey team stages a jersey auction and uses the money to send the their players in the summer to build schools and playgrounds in the Dominican Republic.

At American Sentinel our primary responsibility is, as our mission states, to provide high-quality, innovative degree and certificate programs that enable students to enhance their professional and civic lives. Given that our students are in the healing professions, we believe we best contribute to our communities by ensuring our students are well-prepared to lead in their professions and communities. But we also believe that our responsibilities don’t end there.

American Sentinel University - Making a DifferenceOur program “Making a Difference” is a concerted university and employee effort to support people and communities around the world with contributions of time, money and expertise. Why around the world? As we like to say “everyone counts or nobody counts.”

In addition to jerseys, a partial list of our support this past year includes donations to:

  • The Hope House in Honduras
  • Fight for Air Climb (American Lung Association) Denver
  • Various school and playground projects in the Dominican Republic
  • Children’s Tumor Foundation
  • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
  • International Center of Kentucky (refugee resettlement)
  • Red Nose Day 
  • Mount Saint Vincent
  • World Literacy Foundation
  • Donors Choose
  • Skills2015 (sanitation) Hyderabad, India
  • Denver Health Foundation

Many of our employees support these organizations with their time and expertise. One of the other ways employees support these organizations is to make a contribution that allows them to wear less formal clothes to work.

Casual clothes and hockey jerseys add up to American Sentinel’s own World Cup of Caring!

-Dr. Rick Oliver, CEO of American Sentinel University

* It’s not just hockey jerseys on our walls. In an area reserved for our DNP residency students, we have a “Colorado Corner” with framed jerseys from all major professional sports teams in Denver (Denver Broncos, Colorado Rockies, Denver Nuggets, Colorado Avalanche, and the Colorado Rapids), as well as some of the state’s spectacular mountains.