Financial Aid Resource Center

Financial aid fundingThe Financial Aid Office at American Sentinel University is committed to serving students by providing information to secure the necessary financial resources to meet their educational goals. The goal of the financial aid program at American Sentinel is to provide assistance to students who would not be able to attend college without aid.

As an applicant to American Sentinel, the first step toward receiving financial aid is to complete and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Submitting the FAFSA allows you to apply for federal grants and loans.

Note: Financial Aid is not currently available for the project-based MBA Healthcare program.

Types of Aid

Federal Pell Grants: Read more about need-based grants for undergraduate students with a financial need who have not earned a bachelor’s or professional degree.

The Federal Pell Grant program provides need-based grants to low-income undergraduates who have not earned a bachelor’s or professional degree, to promote access to postsecondary education.

The amount of the Pell Grant a student can receive is determined by filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at www.fafsa.gov. The maximum amount for 2016/17 Award Year is $5,815 for full-time attendance. That is $2,908 per semester.

The amount of the Pell Grant that a student is eligible to receive is dependent on several factors, which include: the expected family contribution (EFC) from the FAFSA, the student’s enrollment status (full-time, ¾-time, ½-time, less than ½ -time), and whether the student attends for a full academic year or less.

See the 2016-2017 Pell Grant Award Schedule.

Direct Stafford Loans: Low-interest loans to help cover the cost of higher education. Read more about types of Direct Stafford Loans.

Direct Stafford Loans from the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program are low-interest loans to help cover the cost of higher education at a four-year college or university, community college, or trade, career or technical school. Eligible students borrow directly from the U.S. Department of Education. There are several types of Direct Stafford Loans:

Direct Subsidized Loans

Direct Subsidized Loans are for students with financial need. American Sentinel University will review the results of your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and determine the amount you can borrow. You are not charged interest while you’re in school at least half time or during grace and deferment periods.

Direct Unsubsidized Loans

You are not required to demonstrate financial need to receive a Direct Unsubsidized Loan. As with Direct Subsidized Loans, American Sentinel will determine the amount you can borrow. Interest accrues on an unsubsidized loan from the time it is first paid out. On Direct Unsubsidized Loans, you can pay the interest while you are in school and during grace periods and deferment or forbearance periods, or you can allow the interest to accrue and be capitalized (added to the principal amount of your loan). If you choose not to pay the interest as it accrues, this will increase the total amount you have to repay because you will be charged interest on a higher principal amount.

Before July 1, 2010, Stafford, PLUS and Consolidation Loans were also made by private lenders under the Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program. As a result of recent legislation, no further loans will be made under the FFEL Program beginning July 1, 2010. All new Stafford, PLUS and Consolidation Loans will come directly from the Department of Education.

Direct Stafford Loan FAQs

How do I apply for a Stafford Loan?

Your first step is to complete the FAFSA. American Sentinel will use the information from your FAFSA to determine how much student aid you are eligible to receive. Direct Stafford Loans are one component of your award package, which may contain other types of aid.

What is the Master Promissory Note?

When you receive a Direct Stafford Loan for the first time, you must complete a Master Promissory Note (MPN). The MPN is a legal document in which you promise to repay your loan amount and any accrued interest and fees to the Department of Education. It also explains the terms and conditions of your loan. In most cases, one MPN can be used for loans that you take out over several years of study. If you previously signed an MPN to receive a FFEL Program loan, you will need to sign a new MPN for a Direct Stafford Loan.

How much can I borrow?

Below are the maximum annual and aggregate (total) loan limits for Subsidized and Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loans. Students can have one type of loan or a combination of both.

Year Dependent Undergraduate Student (except students whose parents are unable to obtain PLUS Loans) Independent Undergraduate Student (and dependent students whose parents are unable to obtain PLUS Loans) Graduate and Professional Degree Student
First Year $5,500 – No more than $3,500 of this amount may be in subsidized loans. $9,500 – No more than $3,500 of this amount may be in subsidized loans. $20,500

Second Year $6,500 – No more than $4,500 of this amount may be in subsidized loans. $10,500 – No more than $4,500 of this amount may be in subsidized loans.

Third and Beyond (each year) $7,500 – No more than $5,500 of this amount may be in subsidized loans. $12,500 – No more than $5,500 of this amount may be in subsidized loans.

Maximum Total Debt from all Stafford Loans When You Graduate (aggregate loan limits) $31,000 – No more than $23,000 of this amount may be in subsidized loans. $57,500 – No more than $23,000 of this amount may be in subsidized loans. $138,500
The graduate debt limit includes Stafford Loans received for undergraduate study.

Please note: You cannot borrow more than your cost of attendance minus any other financial aid you get; therefore you may receive less than the annual maximum amounts. Also, the annual loan limits assume that your program of study is at least a full academic year.

The maximum annual and total loan limits include any Direct Stafford Loans you may have received under the FFEL Program.

Do I receive the loan money, or does American Sentinel?

You’ll be paid through American Sentinel in at least two installments. No installment may exceed one-half of your total loan. American Sentinel will use your loan money first to pay for tuition and fees and other school charges. If any loan money remains, you’ll receive the funds by check or other means, unless you give the school written authorization to hold the funds until later in the enrollment period.

If you are a first-year undergraduate student and a first-time borrower, American Sentinel University cannot disburse your first payment until 30 days after the first day of your enrollment.

What are the current interest rates?

Direct Subsidized Loans

  • Undergraduate students – If the first disbursement is between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017 the interest rate is 3.76% (Lower rates may apply to loans made before this date).
  • Student is not charged interest on the loan while in school at least half-time and during deferment periods.
  • Graduate and professional degree students – No longer eligible for Subsidized Loans.

Direct Unsubsidized Loans

  • Undergraduate students – If the first disbursement of your unsubsidized loan is between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017, the interest rate is 3.76% (Lower rates may apply to loans made before this date).
  • Graduate students. If the first disbursement is between July1, 2016 and June 30, 2017 the interest rate is 5.31%. Student is responsible for interest during all periods.

Prior federal loans and financial aid history – If you currently have a Stafford Loan and would like to check the interest rate, servicer information and other financial aid history, go to the National Student Loan Data System.

Interest rate cap for military members: If you qualify under the Service Members Civil Relief Act, the interest rate on loans you obtained before entering military service may be capped at 6 percent during your military service. You must contact your loan servicer to request this benefit.

In addition, interest is not charged (for a period of no more than 60 months) on Direct Loans first disbursed on or after Oct. 1, 2008, while a borrower is serving on active duty or performing qualifying National Guard duty during a war or other military operation or other emergency, and serving in an area of hostility, qualifying for special pay.

Other than interest, are there other charges for Direct Stafford Loans?

Yes, there is a loan fee on all Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans equal to a percentage of the amount of each loan you receive. For loans first disbursed after October 1, 2015 the loan fee is 1.068 percent.

How do I pay back my loans?

When you receive your first Direct Loan, you will be contacted by the servicer for that loan, whom you will repay. Your loan servicer will provide regular updates on your Direct Loan(s). If you’re not sure who your loan servicer is, you can look it up on the National Student Loan Data System.

When do I begin repaying my loans?

After you graduate, leave school or drop below half-time enrollment, you will have a six-month grace period before you begin repayment. During this period, you’ll receive repayment instructions from your loan servicer, including your first-payment due date. Payments are usually due monthly.

Does the Direct Loan Program offer repayment plans?

Yes, they offer several repayment plan options. Generally, you’ll have 10 to 25 years to repay your loan, depending on the repayment plan that you choose. You will receive more detailed information on repayment options during American Sentinel’s entrance and exit counseling sessions. Learn more about Direct Loan repayment plans.

What if I have trouble repaying the loan?

Under certain circumstances, you can receive a deferment or forbearance that allows you to temporarily stop or lower the payments on your loan. Learn more about your options here.

Can my loan be canceled?

Yes, but only under a few circumstances. Learn more about having your student loan discharged. You also may qualify for forgiveness of some or all of your loan balance if you teach full time for five years at a school or educational service agency serving low-income families and meet other requirements, or after you have made 120 payments on a Direct Loan while employed in one of certain public service jobs (additional conditions apply).

Learn more about the Stafford Loan Forgiveness Program for Teachers and Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program.

Direct PLUS Loans for Parents: Parents may be eligible to obtain a Direct PLUS Loan to help pay their child’s education expenses. Read more about eligibility.

Parents of dependent students may be eligible to obtain a Direct PLUS Loan to help pay their child’s education expenses.

To be eligible for a Direct PLUS Loan for Parents:

  • The parent borrower must be the student’s biological or adoptive parent. In some cases, the student’s stepparent may be eligible. Learn more about providing parent information on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
  • The student must be a dependent student who is enrolled at least half time at an institution that participates in the Direct Loan Program. Generally, a student is considered dependent if he or she is under 24 years of age, has no dependents, and is not married, a veteran, a graduate or professional degree student, or a ward of the court. Find out if you are a dependent or independent student.
  • The parent borrower must not have an adverse credit history (a credit check will be done). If the parent does not pass the credit check, the parent may still receive a loan if a third party (such as a relative or friend who is able to pass the credit check) endorses the loan. The endorser promises to repay the loan if the parent fails to do so. The parent may also still receive a loan if he or she can demonstrate extenuating circumstances.
  • The student and parent must be U.S. citizens or eligible noncitizens, must not be in default on any federal education loans or owe an overpayment on a federal education grant, and must meet other general eligibility requirements for the federal student aid programs. Learn more about student aid eligibility.

Direct PLUS Loans for Parents FAQs

How does a parent get a loan?

For a Direct PLUS Loan, the parent must complete a Direct PLUS Loan Application and Master Promissory Note (MPN). The MPN is a legal document in which the borrower promises to repay the loan and any accrued interest and fees to the Department of Education. It also explains the terms and conditions of the loan.

In most cases, once you’ve submitted the MPN and it’s been accepted, you won’t have to fill out a new MPN for future loans you receive to pay for the educational expenses of the same student. Unless your child’s school does not allow more than one loan to be made under the same MPN, you can borrow additional Direct PLUS Loans on a single MPN for up to 10 years.

You’ll receive a disclosure statement that gives you specific information about any loan that the school plans to disburse under your MPN, including the loan amount and loan fees, and the expected loan disbursement dates and amounts.

How much can a parent borrow?

The annual limit on a Direct PLUS Loan is equal to the student’s cost of attendance minus any other financial aid the student receives. For example, if the cost of attendance is $6,000 and the student receives $4,000 in other financial aid, the student’s parent can request up to $2,000.

How does the parent get the loan money?

The Department of Education will send the loan funds to American Sentinel University. In most cases, the loan will be disbursed in at least two installments, and no installment will be more than one-half the loan amount. The school will use the loan money first to pay the student’s tuition, fees and other school charges. If any loan funds remain, the parent will receive the amount as a check or other means, unless he or she authorizes the amount to be released to the student or transferred into the student’s account at the school. Any remaining loan funds must be used for the student’s education expenses.

What’s the interest rate?

The interest rate is fixed at 6.31 percent. Interest is charged from the date of the first disbursement until the loan is paid in full.

Prior federal loans and financial aid history – Students and parents may check the interest rate, servicer information, and other financial aid history at the National Student Loan Data System.

Interest rate cap for military members – If a parent qualifies under the Service Members Civil Relief Act, the interest rate on loans obtained before entering military service may be capped at 6 percent during the parent’s military service. Parents must contact their loan servicer to request this benefit.

In addition, the Department of Education does not charge interest (for a period of no more than 60 months) on Direct Loans first disbursed on or after Oct. 1, 2008, while a borrower is serving on active duty or performing qualifying National Guard duty during a war or other military operation or other emergency, and serving in an area of hostility, qualifying for special pay.

Other than interest, is there a charge to get a Direct PLUS Loan?

The parent will pay a fee of 4.272 percent of the loan amount, deducted proportionately each time a loan disbursement is made.

When does the parent begin repaying the loan?

The repayment period for a Direct PLUS Loan begins when the loan is fully disbursed, and the first payment is due 60 days after the final disbursement. However, for Direct PLUS Loans with a first disbursement date on or after July 1, 2008, the parent may defer repayment while the student is enrolled at least half time and for an additional six months after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half time.

How does the parent pay back the loan?

The parent will repay the servicer listed on the disclosure statement provided when he or she received the loan. The loan servicer will provide regular updates on any PLUS Loans the parent receives. The loan servicer also will be listed in the parent’s account at the National Student Loan Data System.

Does the Direct PLUS Loan Program offer repayment plans?

Yes, they offer three repayment plans: standard, extended and graduated. The terms differ between the repayment programs, but generally borrowers will have 10 to 25 years to repay a loan. Learn more about Direct PLUS Loan repayment plans.

What if a parent has trouble repaying the loan?

Under certain circumstances, a borrower can receive a deferment or forbearance to temporarily stop or lower the payments on a loan. Learn more about your options here.

Can the parent’s Direct PLUS Loan be transferred to the student?

No. A Direct PLUS Loan made to the parent cannot be transferred to the student. The parent is responsible for repaying the Direct PLUS Loan.

Can a Direct PLUS Loan be canceled?

Yes, under certain conditions a parent may be released from all obligations to repay the loan. Learn more about having your student loan discharged.

Under the Loan Forgiveness for Public Service Employees Program, borrowers may have the balance of their loans forgiven if they are employed full time in a public service job and make 120 payments on their loans during that period. Learn more about the Loan Forgiveness for Public Service Employees Program.

Direct PLUS Loans for Graduate and Professional Degree Students: Read more about how graduate and professional degree students can take out a Direct PLUS Loan to help cover education expenses.

Graduate and professional degree students can take out a Direct PLUS Loan to help cover education expenses. The terms and conditions applicable to PLUS Loans for Parents also apply to Direct PLUS Loans for graduate and professional students. To be eligible, you must not have an adverse credit history. Loans are at a fixed interest rate of 6.31 percent.

Unlike Parent PLUS applicants, student applicants are required to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). In addition, before you can receive a Direct PLUS Loan, American Sentinel University must have determined your maximum eligibility for Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford Loans.

Before July 1, 2010, Stafford, Direct PLUS and Consolidation Loans were also made by private lenders under the Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program. As a result of recent legislation, no further loans will be made under the FFEL Program beginning July 1, 2010. All new Stafford, PLUS and Consolidation Loans will come directly from the U.S. Department of Education.

How do I apply for a Direct PLUS Loan?

For a PLUS Loan, you must complete a Direct PLUS Loan Application and Master Promissory Note (MPN). The MPN is a legal document in which you promise to repay the loan amount and any accrued interest and fees to the Department of Education. It also explains the terms and conditions of the loan. In most cases, one MPN can be used for loans that you receive over several years of study, although a separate loan request must be filed for each school year. If you previously signed an MPN to receive an FFEL PLUS loan, you will need to sign a new MPN for a Direct PLUS Loan.

How much can I borrow?

The maximum Direct PLUS Loan amount you can borrow is your cost of attendance minus any other financial assistance you receive. For example, if the cost of attendance is $6,000 and you receive $4,000 in other financial aid, you can request up to $2,000.

What is the current interest rate?

The interest rate for Direct PLUS Loans is a fixed rate of 6.31 percent.

Prior federal loans and financial aid history – If you currently have a federal loan and would like to check the interest rate, servicer information and other financial aid history, go to the National Student Loan Data System.

Interest rate cap for military members – If you qualify under the Service Members Civil Relief Act, the interest rate on loans you obtained before entering military service may be capped at 6 percent during your military service. You must contact your loan servicer to request this benefit.

In addition, the Department of Education does not charge interest (for a period of no more than 60 months) on Direct Loans first disbursed on or after Oct. 1, 2008, while a borrower is serving on active duty or performing qualifying National Guard duty during a war or other military operation or other emergency, and serving in an area of hostility, qualifying for special pay.

Other than interest, are there any fees or charges to get a PLUS Loan?

Yes. There is a fee of 4.272 percent of the loan amount, deducted proportionately each time a loan disbursement is made.

How do I pay back my loans?

When you receive your first Direct PLUS Loan, you will be contacted by the servicer, whom you will repay. Your loan servicer will provide regular updates on your Direct PLUS Loan(s). If you’re not sure who your loan servicer is, you can look it up on the National Student Loan Data System.

When do I begin repaying the loan?

The repayment period for a Direct PLUS Loan begins when the loan is fully disbursed, and the first payment is due 60 days after the final disbursement. However, you may defer repayment while you are enrolled at least half time. If your Direct PLUS Loan was first disbursed on or after July 1, 2008, you may also defer repayment for an additional six months after you cease to be enrolled at least half time.

Does the Direct PLUS Loan Program offer repayment plans?

Yes, they offer several repayment plan options. Generally, you’ll have 10 to 25 years to repay your loan, depending on the repayment plan that you choose. You will receive more detailed information on your repayment options during entrance and exit counseling sessions at your school. Learn more about Direct Loan repayment plans.

What if I have trouble repaying the loan?

Under certain circumstances, you can receive a deferment or forbearance that allows you to temporarily stop or lower the payments on your loan. Learn more about your options here.

Can my loan be canceled (discharged)?

Yes, but only under a few circumstances. Learn more about having your student loan discharged.

Under the Loan Forgiveness for Public Service Employees Program, borrowers may have the balance of their loans forgiven if they are employed full time in a public service job and make 120 payments on their loans during that period. Learn more about the Loan Forgiveness for Public Service Employees Program.

In-School Loan Deferment – Title IV Eligibility: Read more about the eligibility for an in-school loan payment deferment.

American Sentinel University is a Title IV participating institution, which means you may be eligible for an in-school loan payment deferment, and/or you may be eligible for tax credits.

American Sentinel students who have outstanding Federal Stafford, Perkins or Direct PLUS Loans may file for an in-school deferment of their payments. Eligibility requirements are as follows:

  • Students must be enrolled at least half time. Undergraduate students at American Sentinel must be enrolled in a minimum of six credits per semester to be considered at least half-time students. Graduate students must be enrolled in a minimum of three credits per semester to be considered at least half-time students.
  • Students must be enrolled in a program leading to a degree.
  • Students must make progress toward their expected graduation date in order to continue deferment.

Learn more about deferment, or contact your loan servicer. To apply for deferment, you will need to obtain a deferment form from your servicer and submit it with supporting documentation. You must continue to make loan payments until you receive notification that your deferment has been approved.

American Sentinel Office of Postsecondary Education ID: 041277
American Sentinel status: Title IV participating institution

Hope and Lifetime Learning Tax Credits: Read more about the federal government’s three tuition tax credit programs.

To help you pay for higher education, the federal government offers three tuition tax credit programs. These can reduce your family’s federal income tax bill. Your family may not claim more than one credit for the same student in any one year.

Hope Credit – Only money spent on tuition and fees can be claimed. The student must be in the first two years of post-secondary education and enrolled at least half time in a program leading to an undergraduate degree or other legitimate education credential. Students at American Sentinel need a minimum of 12 credits per academic year to be considered at least half-time students.

American Opportunity Tax Credit – This is a modification of the Hope Credit for 2009 and 2010 only. One difference is that families who owe very little tax or no tax (because their incomes are low) may be able to get some of the credit paid to them directly. Also, the credit can be applied to course-related books and supplies in addition to tuition and fees. The student must be in the first four years of post-secondary education and enrolled at least half time in a program leading to an undergraduate degree or other legitimate education credential.

Lifetime Learning Credit – Only money spent on tuition and fees can be claimed. This credit is available for students in undergraduate or graduate programs and for courses taken to acquire or improve job skills.

Who can claim the tax credit?

If you are claimed as a dependent on another person’s tax return, that person can claim the credit. If you are not listed as a dependent on another person’s tax form and you’ve paid college expenses, you can claim the credit on your tax return.

How can I learn more?

Consult IRS Publication 970, Tax Benefits for Education, for specific details and restrictions. You can also consult your tax advisor or financial planner for more complete information.

American Sentinel Office of Postsecondary Education ID: 041277
American Sentinel status: Title IV participating institution

Disbursing and Returning of Aid

Disbursing Funds: Provision for Books and Supplies

Beginning July 1, 2011 a provision has been added to American Sentinel’s cash management regulations. This new provision states that certain students will be given funds to pay for books and supplies by the seventh day of the payment period (semester).

To be eligible, all of the following criteria must be met:

  • The student must be eligible for a Pell Grant.
  • The student must have enough Title IV funds available to result in a Title IV credit balance. Funds subject to a 30-day delay are not included when determining Title IV credit balance. (First year, first time borrowers are subject to this delay).

Receiving Disbursements

All of the following eligibility requirements must be met in order to be eligible to receive this provision:

  • Verification – If you are selected for verification, this must be complete at least 10 days before the payment period begins.
  • Conflicting information clarification – Any conflicting information must be resolved at least 10 days before payment period begins. For example, if citizenship, selective service, or social security records do not match the data on file with those departments, such conflicts must be resolved.
  • General eligibility requirements must be met at least 10 days before payment period begins. All required documents must be received by the financial aid department and your financial aid packet must be complete. All required documents must be received and your financial aid packet must be complete. All required documents must be received by the financial aid department and your financial aid packet received.
  • Delayed Disbursement Funds subject to 30-day delay are not included when determining Title IV credit balance.

If you withdraw from courses during the semester some or all of the funds may have to be returned to the Title IV programs from which they came.

You have the right to opt out of this provision.

If all of the above requirements are met then you will be notified in writing by the Financial Aid Office of your eligibility. You will then receive a check for the estimated cost of books for the semester, but not until the seventh day of classes.

Return of Federal Financial Aid Funds

Federal regulations are very specific about how American Sentinel University must determine the amount of federal student aid (Title IV) program assistance students have earned and may retain if they withdraw from school.

Withdrawals

Federal student aid is disbursed to you at the beginning of each semester. The assumption is that you will complete all courses for which the aid was disbursed. If you withdraw before the end of the period, American Sentinel must determine the portion of aid that you earned and calculate any Title IV funds that should be returned to the U.S. Department of Education or disbursed to you as a post-withdrawal disbursement.

When you withdraw from courses during a semester, if you received (or American Sentinel or a parent received on your behalf) less aid than you earned (based on the federal formula), you may be eligible to receive additional funds. If you received more aid than you earned, the excess must be returned to the Title IV aid program (by American Sentinel and/or by you).

Calculating Aid Earned

The amount of aid that you have earned is determined on a pro rata basis. For example, if you completed 30 percent of the period of enrollment, then you earned 30 percent of the aid you were awarded. However, once you have completed more than 60 percent of the period of enrollment, you are considered to have earned 100 percent of the aid that you were scheduled to receive for that period.

There may be some Title IV funds that you were scheduled to receive but will not be disbursed to you once you withdraw because of a failure to meet other Title IV eligibility requirements. For example, if you are a first-time, first-year undergraduate student and you did not complete the first 30 days of your program before you withdraw, you will not be eligible to receive any federal Stafford Loan funds.

New Federal Requirement

If you withdraw from courses after starting to attend them at the beginning of your semester but are still registered for courses later in the semester, federal regulations require the Financial Aid Office to obtain written confirmation that you intend to complete the later courses. The Financial Aid Office will send you an email with a subject line of “letter of continuance.”

You will be required to give American Sentinel written confirmation that you will return to the courses indicated in the email within fourteen days of receipt of that email. If you fail to give written confirmation within that time period, we are required to perform a return of federal funds calculation based on the time you have already attended. All other funds must be returned. This may result in a balance due to the university.

Grant Overpayments

Any unearned grant aid that you must return is considered an overpayment. The maximum amount of a grant overpayment is half of the grant funds you received or were scheduled to receive. If you are required to return unearned grant aid funds, you must make arrangements with American Sentinel or the U.S. Department of Education to do so.

Funds Owed to American Sentinel

The requirements for Title IV program funds when you withdraw are separate from American Sentinel’s refund policy. Therefore, you may still owe funds to American Sentinel to cover unpaid institutional charges.

Learn More

If you have questions about your Title IV federal student aid program funds, call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1.800.4.FEDAID (1.800.433.3243). TTY users may call 1.800.730.8913. Information is also available at www.studentaid.ed.gov.

Students Rights and Responsibilities Related to Financial Aid

Students Rights and Responsibilities

Students Rights:

As a student consumer you have the right to know:

  • What financial aid is available to you from all federal, state, and institutional financial assistance programs
  • The deadlines, selection criteria, eligibility requirements, terms policies, procedures, and regulations that apply to each of the programs;
  • How your financial need is determined and how much of your need was met; this includes how costs for tuition and fees, room and board, travel, books and supplies, and personal expenses are included in your student budget;
  • How and when financial aid is paid to students (disbursements);
  • How to continue to maintain eligibility for financial assistance including how the financial aid office determines you are maintaining satisfactory academic progress and what happens if you are not;
  • If you have a student loan, the terms of the loan such as the interest rate, total amount that must be repaid, the procedures for paying, the length of time you have to repay it, when repayment begins, cancellation provisions, deferment and forbearance possibilities;
  • American Sentinel’s refund policies: the portion, if any of tuition and fees that are refunded to you if you withdraw before the end of the term/semester, and the portion, if any, of the financial aid you must pay back if you withdraw before the end of the term.

Students Responsibilities:

It is your responsibility to:

  • Understand and comply with the terms and conditions of the aid that you receive;
  • Use financial aid funds only for education expenses (tuition, fees, room and board, books, supplies and other living costs;
  • Respond promptly to all requests for supplemental information or documentation from the Office of Financial Aid;
  • Know and meet the deadlines to apply and re-apply for financial aid;
  • Complete all financial aid applications and forms with thorough and accurate information;
  • Read, understand and keep copies of all forms you are asked to submit or sign;
  • Notify the Office of Financial Aid if there is any change to information you reported on the FAFSA;
  • Notify the Office of Financial Aid if there are any changes to your enrollment status or level;
  • Notify the Office of Financial Aid if you receive any scholarships, grants, or other financial assistance from sources outside of the university;
  • Know and comply with university refund and withdrawal policies;
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress to continue to be eligible for financial aid;
  • Complete entrance interview and exit interview counseling if you receive a loan;
  • Notify your lender of any changes in your name, address, or school status while you are attending school and after you leave school;
  • Repay any loans you receive;
  • Understand that by signing the FAFSA, you agree that the information provided is accurate and complete and that if you purposely give false or misleading information, you may be fined up to $20,000, sent to prison, or both.

Net Price Calculator

This calculator is intended to provide estimated net price information to prospective students and their families based on what similar students paid in a previous year.