Air Force Critical Care Nurse Earns MSN Nursing Informatics

After Marvin Edmond graduated from high school in Clarksville, Tennessee, he decided to serve his country by joining the United States Air Force. “I knew I wanted to help people, but I wasn’t sure exactly what I wanted to do,” says Marvin. He worked as an Emergency Medical Technician for four years at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska and then in bioenvironmental engineering at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois for another five before deciding that nursing was his calling.

College while in the Air Force

Marvin enrolled in the BSN program at Tuskegee University in 2006 while stationed in Alabama. He joined the Airman Education and Commissioning program, which supported him as a student while he remained on active duty. After graduating in 2009, Marvin became an officer and a clinical nurse at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska, providing care for pre/post-surgical, OB/GYN, orthopedics, pediatrics, oncology, geriatric and end-of-life patients. He also spent one year as a peri-anesthesia nurse.

Critical care fellowship

In 2013, Marvin accepted a 12-month critical care nurse fellowship at San Antonio Military Medical Center, which was designed to help him move into an area such as trauma, cardiovascular, medical, neurological and ICU. “I had been thinking for a while about becoming a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist and the fellowship was a great way to move me in that direction,” he says.

In 2014, Marvin was hired at Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas as an element leader and critical care nurse. “I love what I do. Being a critical care nurse allows me to use my critical thinking skills and help people get through difficult health issues.”

Charting a new course

Although Marvin loves direct patient care, he’s thinking about his future and longevity as a nurse as he grows older. “I am very interested in the technology side of nursing so I started considering informatics,” he says. “I’m all about continuous self-improvement and a master’s degree seemed like a good investment.” Marvin researched programs and discovered the MSN Nursing Informatics at American Sentinel University. At the same time, he realized that a supervisor was also an American Sentinel student—a meaningful endorsement that urged him to take the plunge. Marvin started the MSN Nursing Informatics specialization program in December 2015.

Hard work and sacrifice

Marvin completed his MSN course work in November 2018 and is an official American Sentinel graduate as of this month. The achievement didn’t come without sacrifice and hard work. As a husband, parent and captain in the Air Force, his free time was limited. He was even deployed to Qatar in 2017 in the middle of the program. “I sometimes worked seven days straight for 14 hours a day,” he recalls. “Being a student on top of it all was not easy. But American Sentinel University offered me the flexibility I needed to accomplish my educational goals despite a busy military lifestyle.”

Laying the groundwork for his future

As he makes plans to move into nursing informatics, Marvin has applied for specialty identifier as an informaticist in the Air Force, which could help qualify him as a potential candidate for jobs in that field. “I’m excited about the future,” he says. “The master’s degree will help me be more marketable both in the military and outside of it when I retire and start my civilian career.”

Inspired by Marvin’s story? An MSN program can be your passport to a specialty nursing field, like nursing educationinformatics, nursing management and organizational leadership, or infection control. Specialized knowledge forms the foundation of these nursing fields. When you acquire new knowledge, you can apply it to nursing practice in ways that enhance patient care and improve outcomes.

 Have you dreamed of earning your BSNMSN or DNP? With American Sentinel, you can make that dream a reality.
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