Director of Academic Simulations and Associate Professor Christi Doherty Publishes Second Textbook

Director of Academic Simulations and Associate Professor Christi Doherty Publishes Second Textbook

American Sentinel University Associate Professor Christi Doherty’s textbook, Prioritization & Clinical Judgment for NCLEX-RN, has been published by F.A. Davis Company.

Prioritization & Clinical Judgment for NCLEX-RN

The book is designed to assist nursing students in taking nursing examinations like the NCLEX-RN for licensure as a Registered Nurse. The text focuses on assisting students to improve and enhance their clinical judgment skills, which involve their ability to acquire information, analyze data, recognize findings, make inferences in a clinical situation and implement appropriate nursing interventions.

Here’s a Q&A with Dr. Doherty about her newest book, which is available on Amazon:

Who might be interested in Prioritization & Clinical Judgment for NCLEX-RN?

This book as well as the book I co-authored in 2018, Pharmacology Success: NCLEX®-Style Q&A Review, are intended for nursing students who are working toward becoming RNs. This book helps students practice skills like analyzing information, prioritizing healthcare issues with patients and deciding on treatment methodologies without having to be in the hospital setting.

What is your background as a nurse?

I have been a nurse for 30 years. I spent time in labor and delivery, pediatrics, legal consulting and emergency nursing. I also served in a nursing management role. I got into teaching because I really enjoyed teaching clinicals and thought I might love a classroom—and I do! Prior to American Sentinel, I taught in a prelicensure nursing program at a community college for eight years, so I’m very familiar with the type of mentoring that new nursing students need.

You’re an American Sentinel alumna—how did you end up teaching for the university?

I earned my Doctor of Nursing Practice Educational Leadership from American Sentinel in 2015. After getting my MSN in 2009, my goal was to teach prelicensure students, but the experience made me eager to continue on for a terminal degree. I joined American Sentinel in 2018 after teaching eight years in the ADN program. After teaching for two years in the DNP Nursing Informatics program at American Sentinel, I became the director of academic simulations in January 2020.

How did you start writing books?

It was actually through the DNP program I became interested in publishing my research. I published my capstone project in Nurse Educator (“Impact of Communication Competency Training on Nursing Students’ Self-Advocacy Skills”) in 2016 and the interest continued on from there.

How will Prioritization & Clinical Judgment for NCLEX-RN help future educators, like the students you teach at American Sentinel?

The book gives them a framework to develop their ability to teach new nursing students. Clinical judgment is important and the better we’re able to help students create and judge their own skills, the greater their success rate.

Anything else coming up for you?

I have another book set to come out in October 2020 called Med-Surg Success: NCLEX-Style Q&A Review from F.A. Davis. I have also co-authored a book with Dr. Kris Skalsky (also American Sentinel faculty) called Statistics and Research Design for the DNP student,which will come out this spring.

Learn more about Dr. Doherty’s book on the F.A. Davis Company website.

Do you want to teach the next generation of nurses?

Does teaching like Dr. Doherty appeal to you? We offer nursing education programs. Check out our MSN, Nursing Education program and our DNP, Educational Leadership program. These programs will prepare you to teach the next generation of nurses and lead academic and educational initiatives in healthcare organizations.

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